Consumer privacy protection continues to be top of mind for regulators given a climate where technology companies face scrutiny for lax data governance and poor data stewardship.  Less than a year ago, California passed the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) of 2018, to strengthen its privacy laws.  In many regards, the CCPA served as

Did you know that your zip code is a better predictor of your health than your genetic code? Public health experts – and your health insurance provider – have long known that the air you breath, the education you receive, your net worth, and even the music that you listen to are strong indicators of

What will the telehealth landscape look like under the Donald J. Trump Administration?

The Trump Administration is likely to drive telehealth advancement in a positive direction. For example, President Trump’s plan to reform the Veteran’s Affairs Department includes improved patient care through the use of telehealth technology. There are also some indications that the newly confirmed Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”), Tom Price, is “telehealth friendly.” Recently, during the congressional confirmation hearings, Price mentioned a tele-stroke program in Georgia as a model of success, and he said he thought there were many things that can be done to mirror that kind of technological expansion. Price also said he is interested in promoting telehealth because it “holds great promise, particularly for rural areas experiencing physician shortages and for patients with limited mobility.” Moreover, Trump’s pick to be the next Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”), Seema Verma, said in her recent congressional confirmation hearings that she wants to work with Congress to promote the use of telehealth technology. Specifically, she said, “telehealth can provide innovative means of making healthcare more flexible and patient-centric. Innovation within the telehealth space could help to expand access within rural and underserved areas.” Finally, Maureen Ohlhausen, the recently appointed acting chair of the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”), has in the past spoken favorably regarding the potential of telehealth and has said that the current professional licensure system needs to be rethought given telehealth technology’s potential.

Despite the current focus in Congress on repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, telehealth legislation continues to gain traction and bipartisan support on the Hill. In February, a bipartisan group of 37 Senators sent a letter to Tom Price encouraging HHS to support telehealth and remote patient monitoring. Congress also has embraced telehealth advancement with a consistent stream of proposed legislation seeking to enhance the provision of telehealth services. Most recently, Rep. Joyce Beatty (OH-03) and Rep. Morgan Griffith (VA-09) reintroduced the Furthering Access to Stroke Telemedicine (“FAST”) Act that would expand access to stroke telemedicine (also called “telestroke”) treatment in Medicare. Congress also recently introduced HR 766 which would establish a pilot program to expand telehealth options under the Medicare program for individuals living in public housing. Additionally, Congress is poised to consider at least two bipartisan pieces of legislation focused on telehealth. The first is known as the Creating High-Quality Results and Outcomes Necessary to Improve Chronic (“CHRONIC”) Care Act of 2016, which seeks to modernize Medicare payment policies focused on improving the management and treatment of chronic diseases using telehealth technologies. The second is known as the Creating Opportunities Now for Necessary and Effective Care Technologies (“CONNECT”) for Health Act, which seeks to mandate Medicare reimbursement for telehealth services (beyond the current, limited reimbursement framework). Finally, Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT), the Chairperson of the Senate Finance Committee, recently released his “innovation agenda for the 115th Congress” which encourages the promotion of the “internet of things,” greater broadband investment, and increased device-to-device communication and cross-border data flows.


Continue Reading Telehealth Outlook Under the Trump Administration

We recently wrote about the many failures of health insurance co-ops created under the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”), and the impact of those failures on providers and other creditors, consumers, and taxpayers.

As we described, nonprofit co-op insurers were intended to increase competition and provide less expensive coverage to consumers; however, low prices, lack of