In this episode of the Diagnosing Health Care Podcast:  Since the beginning of 2022, prices for construction services and materials have seen significant increases. How have these increases impacted the advancement of both new and ongoing health care construction projects?

On this episode of our Owner’s Outlook series, hear from special guest Clint Russell, Vice President of Capital Deployment – Construction and Equipment at HCA Healthcare.

Continue Reading Podcast: Owner’s Outlook: HCA’s Clint Russell on Health Care Construction Pricing and Innovation – Diagnosing Health Care

From the Diagnosing Health Care Podcast:  Over the last 12–24 months, Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs) have seen steep cost escalation in their expansion and renovation plans, with expense increases exceeding 10 percent. Combined with nationwide staffing shortages, CAHs are at a crossroads as to how to proceed.

On this episode of our Owner’s Outlook series, hear from special guest Eric Shell, Chairman of Stroudwater Associates, a national advisory firm that designs solutions for rural and community hospitals.

Continue Reading Podcast: Owner’s Outlook: Renovating and Expanding Critical Access Hospitals in a Volatile Market – Diagnosing Health Care

On February 4, 2022, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued important updated guidance in a memo (QSO-21-08-NLTC) regarding how acute and continuing care facilities—including hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, end-stage renal disease facilities, home health agencies, and hospices—manage infection control procedures in light of the COVID-19 public health emergency.

Continue Reading CMS Discontinues Prior Guidance on Visitation Restrictions and Rescinds COVID-19 Focus Infection Control Survey Procedures

On September 30, 2021, the federal Departments of Treasury, Labor, and Health and Human Services issued “Requirements Related to Surprise Billing; Part II,” the second in a series of interim final regulations (the “Second NSA Rules”) implementing the No Surprises Act (“NSA”). This new federal law became effective for services on or after January 1, 2022.

Continue Reading Challenged in Court: Dispute Resolution Rules in Second Federal No Surprises Act Interim Final Regulations

From our Thought Leaders in Health Law video series:  Is your organization ready for the No Surprises Act (NSA)? The law goes into effect January 1, 2022, and contains a new federal ban on surprise billing as well as new disclosure requirements.

The NSA applies to certain payors, providers, facilities, and ancillary service entities that support patients who receive emergency services or other non-emergency services at certain facilities, such as hospitals, hospital outpatient departments, and ambulatory surgical centers.

Continue Reading Video: Getting Ready for the No Surprises Act – Thought Leaders in Health Law

In this episode of the Diagnosing Health Care Podcast:  We’re beginning to see how mergers and acquisitions in the hospital industry are being impacted by President Biden’s executive order promoting competition in the American economy. The Federal Trade Commission recently announced policy changes, and the Department of Justice has been asked to consider policy

In the last couple of months, ballot initiatives have significantly affected health policy and the health industry as a whole. Constituents are becoming more involved in policy matters that have traditionally been left to elected officials in state legislatures. On January 25, 2018, Oregon held a special election for a ballot initiative that asked whether

There has been a growing trend of strategic joint ventures throughout the healthcare industry with the goal of enhancing expertise, accessing financial resources, gaining efficiencies, and improving performance in the changing environment. This includes, for example, hospital-hospital joint ventures, hospital-payor joint ventures, and hospital joint ventures with various ancillary providers (e.g., ambulatory surgery, imaging, home

In an Advisory Opinion dated October 20, 2017, to Crouse Health Hospital (“Crouse Hospital”), the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) agreed that the Non-Profit Institutions Act (“NPIA”) would protect the sale of discounted drugs from Crouse Hospital to the employees, retirees, and their dependents of an affiliated medical practice (Crouse Medical Practice, PLLC) (“Medical Practice”) from