By:  Alaap Shah

Most health care companies are aware of their central repositories of electronic protected health information (“e-PHI”).  Unfortunately, e-PHI often leaks out of central repositories and exists in a variety of “hidden” places.  This data leakage can create real headaches for health care companies, and can lead to violations of privacy and security

When evaluating the various legal and regulatory hurdles associated with telehealth—such as licensure, reimbursement, and privacy—one hurdle that often goes overlooked is the corporate practice of medicine.  Many states have enacted laws which directly or indirectly are viewed as prohibiting the “corporate practice” of medicine.  While variations exist among states, the doctrine

The rapid development and utilization of remote patient monitoring tools in health care exposes the limitations of state licensure laws that generally require physicians to be licensed in states where their patients are located.  These laws are predicated on the physician and patient being in the same jurisdiction.  However, when using mobile-devices to actively monitor

The recent discovery of a security flaw that allows Skype accounts to essentially be hijacked has again raised the issue of the security of web-based platforms—and whether providers can meet their HIPAA obligations when using these communication tools.  The issue of Skype and similar platforms and HIPAA compliance is one that I am often asked