Congress is currently considering two bills that would dramatically alter the ways in which all federal agencies develop and publish rules. If enacted, both would create significant new obligations for agencies such as CMS and the FDA, expand the scope of judicial review of rules, and would increase the potential for political influence over the

As the transition in Washington moves into high gear this month, it’s not just the new Administration and Congress that are putting in place plans for policy and legislation; stakeholders are busy creating agendas, too.

Many stakeholder agendas will seek to affect how government addresses such prominent health care issues as the Affordable Care Act,

Stuart GersonThe U.S. Supreme Court has rendered a unanimous decision in the hotly-awaited False Claims Act case of Universal Health Services v. United States ex rel. Escobar.  This case squarely presented the issue of whether liability may be based on the so-called “implied false certification” theory.  Universal Health Service’s (“UHS) problem originated when it was

Robert E. Wanerman
Robert E. Wanerman

A group of conservative members of Congress have introduced a pair of bills (S. 2724 and H.R. 4768) that would sweep away one of the basic principles of administrative law if they became law. The proposed amendments would make it easier to challenge many determinations involving the Department

Stuart Gerson
Stuart Gerson

Today, the U.S. Supreme Court decided (6-2, with Kennedy writing for the majority and  Ginsburg and Sotomayor dissenting) the case of Gobeille v. Liberty Mutual Insurance Co.  The matter before the Court involved Vermont law requiring certain entities, including health insurers, to report payments relating to health care claims

Supreme CourtWith the untimely passing of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, perhaps the best known and most controversial Justice on the Court, commentators, including this one, have been called upon to assess his legacy – both immediate and long term – in various areas of the law.

Justice Scalia was not known primarily as an antitrust

firm_sgersonIn a split decision announced today, June 25, the U.S. Supreme Court, in King v. Burwell, ruled in upholding the tax credits to individuals in all states, including those with only a federal exchange.  In a 6-3 decision, Chief Justice Roberts delivered the opinion of the Court.

“Congress passed the Affordable Care Act to

In a unanimous decision announced May 26, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Kellogg Brown & Root Services, Inc. v. United States ex rel. Carter, 2015 BL 163948, U.S., No. 12-1497, 5/26/15, ruled that the Wartime Suspension of Limitations Act (“WSLA”) applied only to criminal charges and not underlying civil claims in times of war. Thus,