Posts tagged Megan Robertson.
Blogs
Clock 2 minute read

On October 31, 2023, FDA hosted a webinar to address some of the frequently asked questions the agency has received since the September 29, 2023 release of its proposed rule on laboratory developed tests (“LDTs”). The materials from the webinar are available on FDA’s CDRH Learn webpage. Importantly, FDA announced during the webinar that the agency does not currently plan to extend the comment period for the proposed rule beyond the standard 60-day timeframe, and therefore, comments are still due on Monday December 4, 2023. In both the preamble to the proposed rule and stated ...

Blogs
Clock 3 minute read

In a last minute push before an anticipated government shutdown, FDA put down its marker for moving forward toward regulation of lab developed tests (“LDTs”). Unlike past proposals from FDA and Capitol Hill, FDA has taken a simple approach: laboratories that make LDTs for clinical use are manufacturing in vitro diagnostic medical devices (“IVDs”) for commercial distribution, and as such must eventually comply with FDA’s already-established IVD requirements. The FDA zeitgeist boils down to this: It doesn’t matter if the lab is large or small, for profit or ...

Blogs
Clock 2 minute read

In this episode of the Diagnosing Health Care Podcast Throughout this series, we've talked about the growth of the direct access testing industry and the types of models developed to support the businesses that are using that type of testing.

We've covered reimbursement considerations and physician ordering and specimen collection regulations. How does all of this come together to shape the future of the lab testing industry?

On the final episode of our four-part series on direct access laboratory testing, Epstein Becker Green attorneys Bob HearnJames ...

Blogs
Clock 3 minute read

On August 15, 2023, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) released final guidance on informed consent for clinical investigations (“Final Guidance”). This update follows FDA’s draft guidance, which was issued in July 2014, and supersedes the FDA’s “A Guide to Informed Consent,” which was issued in September 1998. The Final Guidance is intended to assist clinical research stakeholders, such as institutional review boards (“IRBs”), investigators, and sponsors, in complying with FDA’s informed consent regulations for clinical ...

Blogs
Clock less than a minute

As discussed in our June Insight, earlier this year FDA publicly announced its development of a proposed rule that would expressly define laboratory developed tests (“LDTs”) as medical devices and subject them to the agency’s regulatory authority. Such a rule would be FDA’s first comprehensive attempt to impose its authority over LDTs since its 2014 draft guidance, which FDA ultimately chose not to finalize, and comes after several failed congressional legislative attempts to do the same.

Blogs
Clock 2 minute read

In this episode of the Diagnosing Health Care Podcast A complex landscape of state laws overlays the direct access testing model, ranging from physician order requirements, such as telemedicine standards and the corporate practice of medicine doctrine, to specimen collection considerations, including how the varying options for collection could impact a model.

How do these factors combine to create a roadmap for companies navigating the direct access testing industry?

Blogs
Clock 2 minute read

In this episode of the Diagnosing Health Care Podcast:  When analyzing the life cycle of any health care product, a key component to consider is how much the product will cost and who will pay for it.

What unique challenges do direct access tests (DATs) pose when it comes to reimbursement and related compliance requirements?

Blogs
Clock 2 minute read

In this episode of the Diagnosing Health Care Podcast:  What are the various factors impacting stakeholders in the direct access testing industry?

By the end of this four-part series on direct access laboratory testing, listeners will have gained insight into how to navigate the complex regulatory and legal regimes that govern the process of making lab tests available directly to patients and understand the aspects that will dictate how their operations should be structured.

Blogs
Clock 2 minute read

In this episode of the Diagnosing Health Care Podcast:   The Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization decision, which effectively removed the federal constitutional protections for abortion, triggered a series of changes for health care providers and patients alike across the nation with respect to abortion services.

What additional implications are there for certain aspects of clinical trials and research?

On this episode, Epstein Becker Green attorneys Kate Heffernan, Marylana Helou, and Megan Robertson discuss how the changing state laws and regulations post-Dobbs may impact clinical research in different ways for different stakeholders.

Blogs
Clock 5 minute read

Since the passage of the Medical Device Amendments of 1976, FDA has regulated in vitro diagnostic (IVD) tests as medical devices, subject to a full suite of FDA requirements.  During that time, FDA has also asserted that it has the authority to regulate in-house tests developed and performed by CLIA-certified, high-complexity clinical laboratories (generally referred to as laboratory-developed tests or LDTs) but chose as a matter of enforcement discretion not to regulate LDTs.  Over time, the Agency chipped away slowly at LDT enforcement discretion, carving out certain kinds of tests (e.g., direct-to-consumer LDTs) and thus making them subject to regulation, but by and large did not take broad steps to regulate LDTs.

Blogs
Clock less than a minute

In this episode of the Diagnosing Health Care Podcast:  This term, the Supreme Court of the United States is set to rule in a Medicare reimbursement case that has sparked a fresh look at the historical deference often granted to agencies and whether it should remain, be modified, or even be overruled.

Attorneys Stuart GersonRobert Wanerman, and Megan Robertson discuss why Chevron deference matters to health care industry stakeholders and what aspects of deference arguments should be in focus as these cases progress.

The Diagnosing Health Care podcast series examines the ...

Blogs
Clock 2 minute read

In this episode of the Diagnosing Health Care Podcast:  Federal and state cannabis regulation and enforcement appear to be moving in different directions. While the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) has broadened its net to target businesses making claims that their products can treat specific conditions, a growing number of states have passed bills that, among other things, legalize adult-use cannabis.

Epstein Becker Green attorneys Delia DeschaineNathaniel Glasser, and Megan Robertson discuss how developments in 2021 impact the cannabis industry and why ...

Blogs
Clock 3 minute read

Two announcements made by FDA in late October signal a marked change to FDA’s regulatory approach to “homeopathic” drugs. On October 25, 2019, FDA withdrew the 1988 Compliance Policy Guide (“CPG”) 400.400 Conditions Under Which Homeopathic Drugs May Be Marketed, and, concurrently, published revised draft guidance titled Drug Products Labeled as Homeopathic (the “Revised Homeopathic Draft Guidance”).

Homeopathy—an alternative medical approach that began in the late 18th century—is based on the belief that (1) a substance that causes symptoms in a healthy ...

Blogs
Clock 5 minute read

On May 31, 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) hosted its much-anticipated public hearing titled “Scientific Data and Information about Products Containing Cannabis or Cannabis-Derived Compounds” (discussed in our prior blog post). The day-long hearing presented an opportunity for FDA panel members to engage directly with stakeholders on the regulatory future of cannabis or cannabis-derived products within the scope of FDA’s jurisdiction.

Acting FDA Commissioner Ned Sharpless, M.D., kicked off discussions, reminding the panel and ...

Blogs
Clock 2 minute read

On April 2, 2019, FDA issued a press release featuring a statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb announcing the Agency’s latest enforcement actions taken against companies engaging in unlawful marketing of cannabidiol (CBD) products.  Coming just days before Gottlieb’s anticipated departure from the Agency, this news otherwise is unsurprising given recent events on the federal and state level.  In a December 2018 press release issued on the heels of the Farm Bill’s passage, FDA forecast its intention to step up enforcement against CBD products, and earlier this year ...

Blogs
Clock 13 minute read

Eighty years ago today, President Roosevelt signed the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (“FD&C Act”).  In recognition of this anniversary, EBG reviews how the FD&C Act came to be, how it has evolved, and how the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) is enforcing its authority under the FD&C Act to address the demands of rapidly evolving technology.

I’m Just a Bill

The creation of the FD&C Act stems from a sober event in American History.  In 1937, a Tennessee drug company marketed elixir sulfanilamide for use in children as a new sulfa drug.  The diethylene ...

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