Faced with the inability to repeal the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) outright, the Trump Administration and Congress have taken actions to provide more health insurance options for Americans.  Thus far, the Administration announced that they would no longer make cost sharing reduction (“CSR”) payments to insurers on the Exchanges and extended the time period in which short-term, limited-duration insurance (“STLDI”) plans could be offered.  Meanwhile, Congress removed the individual mandate in the 2017 tax bill. The Administration asserts that these efforts are all solutions geared toward helping more Americans receive care as premiums are rising.  A March 28, 2018 Gallup poll showing that health care costs are a higher concern for Americans, over the economy supports the Administration’s asserted justification. However, some states have recently taken their own steps to provide more health coverage options for their citizens while discounting the ACA, possibly reflecting a sense of dissatisfaction with the seemingly dragging feet of the Federal Government.

Idaho

The Governor of Idaho released an Executive Order on January 5, directing the Idaho Department of Insurance to approve options that follow all state-based requirements, even if not all ACA requirements are met, so long as the carrier offering the option also offered an exchange-certified alternative in Idaho and authorized the Director of the Department of Insurance to seek a waiver from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in conjunction with this Executive Order, if the Director believed it is appropriate or necessary.

Idaho officials then released Bulletin No. 18-01 on January 24, which provides new provisions for “state-based plans” for those individuals who do not qualify for premium subsidies under the ACA. Under Idaho’s proposal, insurers would be allowed to (1) sell plans with 50% higher premiums for people with pre-existing conditions; (2) exclude coverage for pre-existing conditions for people who had a gap in coverage; (3) vary premiums by 5-to-1 based on age; (4) exclude coverage for some ACA essential benefits such as maternity care; and (5) set a $1 million annual cap on benefits. All of these provisions are prohibited by the ACA.

In February, Idaho sought approval for the Bulletin by Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”); however, CMS denied the proposition. CMS Administrator Seema Verma wrote a letter stating that Idaho’s proposed requirements are not in compliance with the ACA and warned that, if Idaho did not enforce the ACA standards, CMS would be forced to step in and directly enforce the ACA protections in the Idaho market.  If any health insurance issuer that is subject to CMS’s enforcement authority fails to comply with the ACA requirements, it may be subject to civil monetary penalties for each violation of up to $100 each day, for each responsible entity, for each individual affected by the violation.  Despite the response from CMS, Idaho still seeks to expand coverage options for Idaho residents.

Iowa

In a similar fashion, Governor Kim Reynolds urged the Iowa legislature to make health insurance affordable for Iowa residents in the Condition of the State Address.  On April 2, the Governor signed into law a bill that allows small businesses or self-employed individuals to band together to buy coverage through association health plans that do not comply with ACA plans.  The legislation would allow insurers to deny coverage to those with pre-existing conditions, create lifetime caps, and does not offer maternity care.   However, proponents of the bill emphasize that the coverage would not be considered insurance, but rather would simply function as a “health benefits plan”.  Proponents also note that these plans are cheaper alternatives for small employers or the self-employed.

Key Takeaways

States creating affordable health coverage with blatant disregard for the ACA is a note-worthy development in today’s tense healthcare climate. The outcome of the push of these initiatives by states is crucial because they are challenging the Administration’s willingness to enforce the ACA. Tolerance of such state plans would lead to cherry-picking, which would inevitably cause further destabilization of the market. Notably, CMS and Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar have each emphasized upholding ACA as the law of the land. Stakeholders should pay attention to the outcome of these proposals because not only would the implementation of these plans destabilize markets, but the plans could also incentivize more states to follow suit and create their own plans.

In response to Republicans’ failure to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the Trump Administration is using administrative action to modify the ACA and health insurance options for Americans. On October 12, 2017, President Trump signed an executive order that instructs various departments to consider regulations related to association health plans and short-term insurance. Shortly after, the Administration announced that they would no longer make cost sharing reduction (CSR) payments to insurers on the Exchanges.  Section 1402 of the ACA requires insurance companies to reduce the amount that eligible low-income policyholders pay out of pocket for co-payments and deductibles.  Accordingly, the federal government must reimburse insurers for reductions when the Secretary of HHS is notified.

Without these payments, insurers will either increase premiums or pull out of the Exchanges altogether. In anticipation of the announcement, some insurers have already increased premiums for the 2018 enrollment period. In spite of this, policy makers can mitigate the harm that could be felt as a result of not funding CSR payments.

The Passage of the Murray-Alexander Stabilization Bill

Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) and Ranking Member Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) revealed a bipartisan plan to help stabilize the insurance market. The Murray-Alexander Bill seeks to stabilize the insurance market by funding the CSR subsidies and increasing state flexibility in their administration of the Marketplace.

The bill proposes to fund CSR payments for the remainder of 2017, as well as 2018 and 2019. The bill also reduces the time for the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) review of 1332 waivers, from 180 days to 90 days and creates a new 45 day expedited review process for qualifying circumstances. Through Section 1332 waivers, states are allowed to implement insurance market innovations that provide coverage “comparable” in benefits and affordability.

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) scored the Murray-Alexander Bill and found that it would cut the federal deficit by $3.8 billion in the next decade. The CBO notes that savings would come from states offering lower-cost policies, attracting younger and healthier individuals into the market.  Insurers would lower their premiums because of the influx of younger individuals and in the long-term, save the government more than $1.1 billion in premium tax credits. Despite the savings scored by CBO, the Murray-Alexander bill will not have an affect on 2018 plans. Further, the bill may not pass before open enrollment ends on December 15.  The bill has bipartisan support in the Senate, but will have difficulties in the House because of Speaker Paul Ryan’s opposition to the current version.

State Efforts

States can play a role in telling insurers where to apply their premium increases. For example, states could tell insurers to apply premiums to only Silver marketplace plans, all metal level plans inside and outside the marketplace, or all Silver plans inside and outside the marketplace. About 30 states assumed that CSR payments would not be disseminated and either encouraged or required states to increase premiums onto marketplace silver plans only. States that choose this option allows consumers in the marketplace to receive premium tax credits and consumers outside the marketplace to not experience any increase in premiums. Additionally, some legal scholars and health policy experts argue that states could pay for the premium themselves and then bill the federal government.

Legal Challenges

Eighteen states and the District of Columbia sued the Trump Administration seeking an immediate injunction to block President Trump from ending CSR payments to insurers. California federal judge, U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria, denied the motion for an injunction.  Judge Chhabria argued that states had enough time to plan for the end of the cost-sharing payments and adjusted accordingly. Although Judge Chhabria has denied the injunction, California Attorney, General Xavier Becerra, will still proceed with the lawsuit.

Despite the Trump Administration’s attempt to unravel parts of the ACA, states and Congress are working to anticipate more downstream impacts and must act to find solutions or ways to mitigate the issues that will arise for low-income policy holders.

Stakeholders should anticipate a continuation of unstable markets as insurers will have to adjust their rates or leave the Exchanges if there are no changes made to fund CSR payments. State regulators will have to use creativity and flexible ways to help their constituents.