The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (“MedPAC”) met in Washington, DC, on April 6-7, 2017. The purpose of this and other public meetings of MedPAC is for the commissioners to review the issues and challenges facing the Medicare program and then make policy recommendations to Congress. MedPAC issues these recommendations in two annual reports, one in March and another in June. MedPAC’s meetings can provide valuable insight into the state of Medicare, the direction of the program moving forward, and the content of MedPAC’s next report to Congress.

As thought leaders in health law, Epstein Becker Green monitors MedPAC developments to gauge the direction of the health care marketplace. Our five biggest takeaways from the April meeting are as follows:

1. MedPAC unanimously passes a draft recommendation aimed at improving the current ASP payment system and developing the Drug Value Program as an alternative, voluntary program.

In the March meeting, MedPAC discussed a proposed recommendation to address the rapid growth in Part B drug spending. The short-term policy reforms for the current ASP payment system would be made in 2018, while the Drug Value Program would be created and phased in no later than 2022. MedPAC passes this draft recommendation unanimously with no changes. In the June report to Congress, MedPAC intends to add text to reflect more detail on certain issues, as well as other approaches and ideas for reducing Part B drug spending.

2. MedPAC discusses key issues addressed in a draft chapter on premium support in Medicare to appear in MedPAC’s June report.

MedPAC has developed a draft chapter on premium support in Medicare to serve as guidance if such a model were to be adopted. MedPAC does not take a position on whether such a model should be adopted for Medicare. A premium support model would include Medicare making a fixed payment for each beneficiary’s Part A and Part B coverage, regardless of whether the beneficiary enrolls in fee-for-service or a managed care plan. The beneficiary premium for each option would reflect the difference between its total cost and the Medicare contribution. The draft chapter addresses key issues for this model from previous MedPAC sessions, including the treatment of the fee-for-service program, standardization of coverage options, the calculation of benchmarks and beneficiary premiums, as well as a new proposal regarding premium subsidies for low-income beneficiaries. The draft chapter will be included in MedPAC’s June report to Congress.

3. MedPAC unanimously passes a draft recommendation for the implementation of a unified prospective payment system for post-acute care.

In the March meeting, MedPAC proposed a draft recommendation regarding a PAC PPS. During the discussion in the previous meeting, the percent of the reduction in aggregate payments was the largest point of contention. MedPAC decided the proposed 3% reduction was too low, and increased the reduction to aggregate payments to 5% for the finalized draft recommendation. MedPAC passes this draft recommendation unanimously with the change to the reduction of aggregate payments.

4. Regional variation in Medicare Part A, Part B, and Part D spending and service use

MedPAC compared its most current evaluation of geographic differences in Medicare Program spending and service use with calculations from previous years. The primary takeaway from the current data was that there was much less variation in service use relative to variation in spending.  Most of the service use variation in Part A and B services came from post-acute care.  Among Prescription Drug Plan (PDP) enrollees, drug use also varied less than drug spending.

5. Measuring low-value care in Medicare

MedPAC has been measuring the issue of low-value care, meaning services considered to have little or no clinical benefit, for the last three years. In June 2012, MedPAC had also recommended value-based insurance design, in which the Secretary could alter cost-sharing based on evidence of the value of services. In order to do so, however, CMS would first need information on how to define and measure low-value care.  MedPAC has been using 31 claims-based measures for low value care developed by researchers and published in JAMA. For 2014, MedPAC’s analysis found that 37% of beneficiaries received at least one low-value service.  Medicare spending for these services was estimated to be $6.5 billion.  MedPAC acknowledges that this estimate is conservative because the measures used do not also include downstream services that may result from the initial low-value service.  MedPAC also briefly discussed the issues associated with formulating performance measures in general, including for the merit-based incentive payment system (MIPS) included in Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act.

The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (“MedPAC”) met in Washington, DC, on October 6-7, 2016. The purpose of this and other public meetings of MedPAC is for the commissioners to review the issues and challenges facing the Medicare program and then make policy recommendations to Congress. MedPAC issues these recommendations in two annual reports, one in March and another in June. MedPAC’s meetings can provide valuable insight into the state of Medicare, the direction of the program moving forward, and the content of MedPAC’s next report to Congress.

As thought leaders in health law, Epstein Becker Green monitors MedPAC developments to gage the direction of the health care marketplace. Our five biggest takeaways from the October meeting are as follows:

1. While Accountable Care Organizations received high marks for quality they failed to produce Medicare savings in 2015.

MedPAC staff provided a status report on Medicare Accountable Care Organizations (“ACOs”). The report found that while ACOs received high marks for quality they failed to produce significant Medicare savings in 2015. Pioneer model ACOs produced net savings of only $5 million while Medicare Shared Savings ACOs cost the Medicare program $216 million. The MedPAC staff conducted a review of the ACO data and found that ACOs in the south, those that are physician led, and are smaller in size were more likely to produce savings. However, the most important variable was the historic level of service use in the area where the ACO was located. Regions with a high historic use of services had more success producing savings.

2. MedPAC finds the rate of potentially avoidable hospital admissions varied significantly among long-stay nursing facilities.

As part of an ongoing project to develop measures to properly evaluate initiatives aimed at reducing the number of hospital admissions and use of skilled nursing facilities among long-stay nursing facility residents, MedPAC staff found a wide discrepancy among nursing facility providers. Overall the staff found that in 2014 long-stay nursing residents accounted for 200,000 “potentially avoidable” hospital admissions and 20 million days of skilled nursing facility care. They found that nursing facilities with fewer than 100 beds and rural nursing facilities made up a disproportionate share of facilities with high potentially avoidable hospital admission rates. The data showed that some facility-level characteristics affected the rate of potentially avoidable hospital admissions; facilities with higher portions of hospice days and access to x-ray services on site had lower potential avoidable admissions, and facilities with a higher use of licensed practical nurses and lower frequency of physician visits had higher rates of hospital use.

3. MedPAC considering suggesting changes to Part B drug payment policies.

MedPAC discussed a number of policy options with respect to the Part B drug payments. The options the Commission discussed sought to either increase price competition and address the growth in Part B prices or improve the current payment formula and available data.  The polices designed to increase price completion and address price growth  included: consolidating billing codes for drugs and biologics with similar health effects, limit the growth in drug prices based on inflation, and introduced a restructured competitive acquisition program. The policies designed to improve the payment formula and improve available data included: modifying the average sale price add-on formula, modifying the wholesale accusation cost formula, and strengthen the manufacture reporting requirements. MedPAC is expected to continue to actively work towards developing policy recommendations regarding Part B drug payment reforms.

4. MedPAC continues to develop a premium support model to reward high quality plans and ACOs and incentivize beneficiaries to seek out high quality care.

As part of its efforts to develop a payment model that rewards high quality care and incentivizes beneficiaries to seek high quality care MedPAC continued its discussion of alternative quality measures that could be used across the Medicare delivery system. Under this alternative model Medicare would use a smaller number of population based health outcomes and patient experience to measures to measure quality across the delivery spectrum (including fee-for service). The Commission suggests that these quality measures be collected at a local market level; each market will then be given a quality benchmark based on the measures. Medicare Advantage (“MA”) plans and ACOs which have quality scores that are higher than the benchmark would see an increased federal contribution to lower beneficiary premiums, with the hope of pushing more beneficiaries into higher quality delivery systems based on the lower beneficiary premiums.

5. MedPAC is considering how to improve Medicare’s behavioral health benefits.

MedPAC staff gave an overview of behavioral health issues among Medicare beneficiaries and of highlighted potential areas for programmatic improvement. The staff suggested Medicare improve payment of inpatient psychiatric care and work towards integrating primary care delivery and behavioral health services. MedPAC appears to be committed to dedicating more resources towards developing policy options for achieving these suggestions in the future.

Robert E. Wanerman
Robert E. Wanerman

Even after the Secretary of HHS admitted that the current backlog of Medicare Part B appeals would take ten years to adjudicate at current staffing and funding levels, that was not enough for a hospital to obtain any relief from a court. Cumberland County Hospital System, Inc. v. Burwell, No. 15-1393 (4th Cir., Mar. 7, 2016).  In that case, a North Carolina hospital had initially been paid for over 900 claims, but those claims were subsequently determined to be ineligible after a post-payment review by a Recovery Audit Contractor (“RAC”), which sought to recover over $12 million from the hospital.  Although the hospital complied with the deadlines for filing administrative appeals, the Medicare Office of Hearings and Appeals had not held hearings or made determinations within the 90-day deadline in the Medicare statute. In order to expedite the process, the hospital sought a writ of mandamus from a federal court to order the Secretary to conduct the hearings.  The district court denied the motion, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit agreed with the Secretary that no relief was warranted.

The court noted the Secretary’s admission that there are over 800,000 pending Medicare appeals, and that absent any legislative remedy it would take over ten years to hear and decide the current caseload.  Despite these appalling statistics and the court’s own statement that, “HHS’s procedural arteries are seriously clogged,” the court agreed with the Secretary that because the Medicare statute gives claimants the option of escalating their claim to the next level of review if hearing deadlines are not met, the hospital was not entitled to the court order it sought.

The Cumberland County decision highlights a critical step for anyone seeking to appeal a Medicare coverage or reimbursement decision: making sure that the record is complete as early as possible in the appeal process.  Under the Medicare hearing regulations, it becomes more difficult to introduce additional evidence at each level of review, and new evidence will not be considered by a reviewing court. As a result, anyone appealing an unfavorable Medicare decision should either be prepared to be patient, or should make a complete record as early as possible in the process if an option is escalating an appeal to a higher level to get a timely hearing.  Although Congress is considering legislation that may help, the degree of that help or when that help may arrive is still too uncertain to predict.

Epstein-Becker-Green-ClientAlertHCLS_gif_pagespeed_ce_KdBznDCAW4In February 2012, two years after the passage of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) issued a proposed rule, which was subject to significant public comment, concerning reporting and returning certain Medicare overpayments (“Proposed Rule”). On February 12, 2016, four years from the issuance of the Proposed Rule (and six years after passage of the ACA), CMS issued the final rule, which becomes effective on March 14, 2016 (“A and B Final Rule”).

The A and B Final Rule applies only to providers and suppliers under Medicare Parts A and B. The return of overpayments under Medicare Parts C and D are addressed in a final rule that was published by CMS in May 2014 (“C and D Final Rule”). To date, no final regulations have been adopted that address Medicaid requirements.

Among other things, the A and B Final Rule and its preamble provide:

  • a six-year lookback period;
  • that providers and suppliers must exercise “reasonable diligence” in connection with identifying potential overpayments;
  • that the time period to conduct “reasonable diligence” should be no more than six months, except in extraordinary circumstances; and
  • that “identification” includes quantifying the amount of the overpayment.

Kirsten M. Backstrom, George B. Breen, Anjali N.C. Downs, David E. Matyas, and Meghan F. Weinberg coauthored a Health Care and Life Sciences Client Alert that addresses a number of the significant provisions of the A and B Final Rule, describes an important difference between the two final rules, and sets forth a list of nine key “takeaways” that we believe all Medicare providers and suppliers should be aware of.

Click here to read the full Health Care and Life Sciences Client Alert.