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Chicago Releases Draft Rules on Pharmaceutical Representative Licensure

In a previous blog post, we discussed a City of Chicago Ordinance, set to take effect on July 1, 2017, that will require pharmaceutical sales representatives to obtain a license before being able to operate within city limits. The draft rules for this ordinance were released on March 17, 2017.

These rules provide additional detail regarding the licensure requirements as well as other associated education and disclosure requirements with which pharmaceutical representatives will be expected to comply beginning in July of this year. In order to obtain initial licensure as a pharmaceutical representative, applicants must complete an online course … Continue Reading

Long-Awaited Accessibility Standards for Medical Diagnostic Equipment Are Released

Our colleagues Joshua A. Stein and Frank C. Morris, Jr., at Epstein Becker Green have a post on the Health Employment And Labor blog that will be of interest to many of our readers: “The U.S. Access-Board Releases Long-Awaited Final Accessible Medical Diagnostic Equipment Standards.”

Following is an excerpt:

As part of a flurry of activity in the final days of the Obama Administration, the U.S. the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (the “Access Board”) has finally announced the release of its Accessibility Standards for Medical Diagnostic Equipment (the “MDE Standards”).  Published in the Federal Register … Continue Reading

Replace Without Repeal?

On Monday, January 23rd, Senators Bill Cassidy (R-LA) and Susan Collins (R-ME) introduced the Patient Freedom Act of 2017 (“PFA”), the first of what may be many Republican Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) “replacement” alternatives. The PFA is notable for several reasons. It is the first replacement plan to be introduced in the 115th Congress, it is sponsored by Senators who are considered comparatively moderate on health issues, and thus its content may represent an opportunity for compromise in the future, and, perhaps most interestingly, does not actually repeal the ACA. The overarching feature of the PFA is … Continue Reading

Congress Wants to Reform Agency Rulemaking: Refinements or Tectonic Shifts?

Congress is currently considering two bills that would dramatically alter the ways in which all federal agencies develop and publish rules. If enacted, both would create significant new obligations for agencies such as CMS and the FDA, expand the scope of judicial review of rules, and would increase the potential for political influence over the rulemaking process. Both bills passed the House on party-line votes, and are under consideration by the Senate.

The first bill, H.R. 5, would overhaul multiple phases of the federal rulemaking process. These proposed changes would make the rulemaking process significantly longer and more complex for … Continue Reading

Stakeholder Agendas in the Washington Transition: 5 Takeaways for Converting Ideas into Technically Effective Proposals

As the transition in Washington moves into high gear this month, it’s not just the new Administration and Congress that are putting in place plans for policy and legislation; stakeholders are busy creating agendas, too.

Many stakeholder agendas will seek to affect how government addresses such prominent health care issues as the Affordable Care Act, Medicare entitlements, fraud-and-abuse policies, FDA user fees, and drug pricing. There will be a myriad of stakeholder ideas, cutting a variety of directions, all framed with an eye to the new political terrain.

But whatever policies a stakeholder advocates, ideas must be translated into a … Continue Reading

New Federal and State Initiatives Seek to Combat Antimicrobial Resistance

Recent federal and state legislative efforts signal an increased focus on a significant and largely underappreciated public health threat – antimicrobial resistance (i.e., when a microorganism (such as a bacteria or virus) is able to resist the effects of medications such as antibiotics and antivirals, causing such medications to be ineffective). The results of a 2014 study underscore the magnitude of the threat of so-called “superbugs,” estimating that the number of deaths worldwide attributable to antimicrobial resistance will reach 10 million by 2050.  By comparison, the same study projected 8.2 million deaths from cancer, and 1.2 million deaths from traffic … Continue Reading

Parallel Review – Forcing Manufacturers to Go All In

On October 24, 2016 the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) in conjunction with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) announced their intention to extend the Parallel Review pilot program indefinitely. The Parallel Review process is intended to provide timely feedback on clinical data requirements from FDA and CMS, and minimize the time required for receiving Medicare coverage nationally.  Sounds good.  So, why have so few manufacturers taken advantage of the program to date?

Despite its admirable goals, the current Parallel Review Process is too limited in scope and involves significant risks for manufacturers.

The standard process for obtaining … Continue Reading

If At First It Doesn’t Succeed—FTC Will Try, Try Again to Oppose Hospital Mergers

Recently, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) faced major losses in challenging hospital mergers.  However, it is clear that the FTC is not backing down, especially given its tendency to conclude that proposed efficiencies do not outweigh the chance of lessening competition.

In July of this year, the FTC abandoned a challenge to the proposed merger of St. Mary’s Medical Center and Cabell Huntington Hospital in West Virginia after state authorities had changed West Virginia law and approved the merger despite the FTC’s objections. This year as well, the FTC failed to enjoin the Penn State Hershey Medical Center and PinnacleHealth … Continue Reading

Recent California Court Decision Provides Useful Guidance for Management Services Organizations (MSOs)

The California Court of Appeals, Second Appellate District (the “Court”) in Epic Medical Management, LLC v. Paquette rendered an decision that was published earlier this year that is helpful to those who engage in provision of management services to physicians or medical groups (possibly other professionals as well) including, without limitation, hospitals, health systems or private equity backed organizations.  In this case, although not directly ruling on the legality of the arrangement, the Court states that if it had so ruled, it would have determined that a comprehensive management services agreement for management of a physician’s practice, which used a … Continue Reading

Defend Trade Secrets Act Signed Into Law

On May 11, 2016, President Obama signed into law the Defend Trade Secrets Act (“DTSA”), which became effective immediately. The DTSA provides the first private federal cause of action for trade secret misappropriation, and it allows parties to sue in federal court for trade secret misappropriation—regardless of the dollar value of the trade secrets at issue.   Employers in the health care and life science industry may want to note that the DTSA

requires that employers provide certain notices of these whistleblower protections in employment-related agreements that govern trade secrets or other confidential information entered into or amended after May 11,

Continue Reading

Surprise Health Care Bill Protections Addressed in President Obama’s 2017 Budget for Health and Human Services

In its Fiscal Year 2017 Private Insurance Legislative Proposals, President Obama’s Budget contains a provision seeking to “eliminate surprise out-of-network healthcare charges for privately insured patients.” Described as an attempt to “promote transparency on price, cost, and billing for consumers,” this measure requires hospitals and physicians to collaborate so that patients receiving treatment at in‐network facilities do not face unexpected charges from out‐of‐network practitioners. This provision could have far-reaching effects, potentially impacting enrollees in traditional commercial plans, Exchange plans and government plans (such as Medicare Advantage plans).

A surprise bill situation arises when patients incur unexpected, out‐of‐network charges when … Continue Reading

CMS Issues Long-Awaited Rule Regarding Reporting and Returning Overpayments

Epstein-Becker-Green-ClientAlertHCLS_gif_pagespeed_ce_KdBznDCAW4In February 2012, two years after the passage of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) issued a proposed rule, which was subject to significant public comment, concerning reporting and returning certain Medicare overpayments (“Proposed Rule”). On February 12, 2016, four years from the issuance of the Proposed Rule (and six years after passage of the ACA), CMS issued the final rule, which becomes effective on March 14, 2016 (“A and B Final Rule”).

The A and B Final Rule applies only to providers and suppliers under Medicare Parts A and B. The return … Continue Reading

Zika Virus: What Employers Should Know – Employment Law This Week

The top story on Employment Law This Week is the unfolding Zika virus crisis.

For the fourth time in history, the World Health Organization has declared a global public health emergency, following the spread of the Zika virus throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. The disease can have harmful effects on fetuses, and the CDC has warned against travel for pregnant women and their partners. The Zika crisis has important implications for employers. Workers who travel for their jobs may request accommodations, and employers should make them aware of the risks if they aren’t already. Denise Dadika, from Epstein … Continue Reading

New York Considers Possible Solutions for Health Insurer Insolvencies

We recently wrote about the many failures of health insurance co-ops created under the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”), and the impact of those failures on providers and other creditors, consumers, and taxpayers.

As we described, nonprofit co-op insurers were intended to increase competition and provide less expensive coverage to consumers; however, low prices, lack of adequate government funding, restrictions on the use of federal loans for marketing, and low risk corridor payments from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services created financial challenges for these insurance plans. Facing insolvency, state regulators have ordered many plans to cease offering coverage and … Continue Reading

Loose Lips Sink Ships: New Liabilities Under The Affordable Care Act

Epstein Becker Green’s Peter M. Panken and Frank C. Morris, Jr. have authored a post on the Hospitality Labor and Employment Law blog entitled, “Loose Lips Sink Ships: New Liabilities Under The Affordable Care Act.”

Following is an excerpt:

The Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) requires larger employers (50 or more full time equivalents) to offer “affordable” “minimum value” health care to employees working thirty (30) or more hours per week or face the possibility of significant penalties in some cases.  Thus the cost of staffing with part time employees may be far less than paying for health insurance

Continue Reading

Zika Update – WHO Declares Public Health Emergency

On Monday, the World Health Organization (“WHO”) declared the rise in birth defects linked to the Zika virus outbreak a public health emergency, marking only the fourth time that the WHO has made such a declaration. This announcement by the WHO underscores the seriousness of the Zika virus outbreak and, hopefully, will pave way for a coordinated and well-funded global response to this serious public health problem that may include intensified mosquito control efforts, expedited creation of a more rigorous diagnostic test to detect the virus, and development of a preventive vaccine.

Reports of the Zika virus first surfaced … Continue Reading

Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 – Potential Impact on Hospitals

House Republican leaders introduced legislation on Monday, finalizing a two-year budget agreement between Congressional leaders and the White House. This legislation is currently being considered and may be up for a vote as early as Wednesday on the bipartisan budget deal.

Hospitals should note the language in Section 603 (which is on pages 35-39 of the draft bill) codifies the definition of a “provider-based off-campus hospital outpatient department” (PBD HOPD) as a location that is not on the main campus of a hospital and is located more 250 yards from the main campus.  The section defines a “new” PBD HOPD … Continue Reading

340B Program and Mega-Guidance Webinar

Constance Wilkinson, Member of Epstein Becker Green, will co-present on a webinar on “340B Program and the Proposed Mega-Guidance” on October 22, 2015, from 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. ET.

With recent publication of the long-awaited proposed “Mega-Guidance,” the federal 340B Drug Discount Program (“the 340B Program”) is poised for significant changes. This webinar describes the 340B Program’s historical background, practices, and challenges that resulted in the proposed policies and goals reflected in the Mega-Guidance. In addition to learning about the history of the 340B Program, participants will be educated on how it works—what manufacturers and providers must do … Continue Reading

BNA Webinar: Opportunities and Obstacles: Accountable Care Organizations and Other Provider Risk Sharing Arrangements — a Legal and Regulatory Overview

Epstein Becker Green’s Lynn Shapiro Snyder, Senior Member of the Firm, and Tanya Vanderbilt Cramer, Of Counsel, will present “Accountable Care Organizations and Other Provider Risk Sharing Arrangements — a Legal and Regulatory Overview,” a webinar hosted by Bloomberg BNA.

While the federal government has encouraged the growth of accountable care organizations (ACOs) through the Affordable Care Act, the regulation of ACOs and other provider risk sharing arrangements remains a patchwork of federal and state requirements that span many different areas of law. This webinar will explore some of the regulatory issues faced by ACOs, integrated delivery systems, … Continue Reading

HRSA Issues Proposed “Omnibus Guidance”

The Health Resources and Services Administration (“HRSA”) issued a notice proposing guidance under the 340B Drug Pricing Program.  The proposed Omnibus Guidance was issued in pre-publication format and is available online at https://s3.amazonaws.com/public-inspection.federalregister.gov/2015-21246.pdf.  The notice is scheduled to be published in the Federal Register on August 28, 2015 and will be available at https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/08/28/2015-21246/guidance-340b-drug-pricing-program-omnibus.

HRSA intends to finalize the proposed guidance after consideration of public comments.  The notice is open for a 60-day public comment period, with comments due on or before October 27, 2015.

The proposed Omnibus Guidance notice attempts to clarify current 340B Program … Continue Reading

BNA Webinar: Opportunities and Obstacles: Preparing for the Transition to the ICD-10 Code Set

On Tuesday, September 1, 2015, from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM ET, George BreenChair of Epstein Becker Green’s National Health Care and Life Sciences Practice Steering Committee, will co-present “Opportunities and Obstacles: Preparing for the Transition to the ICD-10 Code Set,” a webinar hosted by Bloomberg BNA.

With the transition to the ICD-10 code set coming in October, the health-care industry is grappling with adopting new technology and making last-minute preparations. The switch to ICD-10 also presents new opportunities to increase productivity and improve patient health.

The International Classification of Diseases is a standardized coding system used by … Continue Reading

The DC Circuit Speaks – Proving Condition of Payment is Key To Implied Certification False Claims Act Cases

On July 10, 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit made clear that in False Claims Act cases brought under an implied certification theory, certifying compliance with the federal statute or regulation at issue must be a condition of payment.

In United States ex rel. Davis v. District of Columbia, No. 14-7060, 2015 WL 4153919 (D.C. Cir. Jul. 10, 2015), a qui tam relator alleged that the District of Columbia had failed to maintain certain records supporting certain cost reports it submitted to the District of Columbia Medical Assistance Administration, purportedly in violation of record-keeping … Continue Reading

SCOTUS Upholds Exchange Subsidies – King v. Burwell

firm_sgersonIn a split decision announced today, June 25, the U.S. Supreme Court, in King v. Burwell, ruled in upholding the tax credits to individuals in all states, including those with only a federal exchange.  In a 6-3 decision, Chief Justice Roberts delivered the opinion of the Court.

“Congress passed the Affordable Care Act to improve health insurance markets, not to destroy them. If at all possible, we must interpret the Act in a way that is consistent with the former, and avoids the latter. Section 36B can fairly be read consistent with what we see as Congress’s plan, and Continue Reading

DOJ Further Delays Release of Highly Anticipated Proposed Website Accessibility Regulations for Public Accommodations

Joshua A. Stein, a Member of the Firm in the Labor and Employment practice at Epstein Becker Green, has a Hospitality Labor and Employment Law blog post that will be of interest to many of our readers: “DOJ Further Delays Release of Highly Anticipated Proposed Website Accessibility Regulations for Public Accommodations.”

Following is an excerpt:

For those who have been eagerly anticipating the release of the U.S. Department of Justice’s proposed website accessibility regulations for public keyboard-4x3_jpgaccommodations under Title III of the ADA (the “Public Accommodation Website Regulations”), the wait just got even longer.  The recently released … Continue Reading